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THOUGHTS ABOUT COMMUNION

+ It’s been written that God needs absolutely nothing form us, but he wants our love, appreciation, and worship, etc. I know that without the sacrifice of Jesus body and his blood I would have no hope of heaven when death comes. It seems very little to ask that during the communion or Lord’s supper that I focus on just what the greatness of these actions means for me.

+ I’ve heard people express what they believe are the appropriate personal acts and thoughts during communion. Several years ago, a preacher stated that we could not pray during the taking of communion. His statement was a matter of fact, and he did not offer any scripture to support his statement nor any reasoning for his belief. I’ve never figured out his reasoning. Often, I do pray with very much thanksgiving for such an act of love. We each must use our own way of showing our sincere love for the sacrifice of Jesus’ body and his blood.

+ When our son, Chad, was 3 or 4 years old, his pediatrician thought he had allergies, so we took him to an allergist. The doctor wanted to test him for seasonal and food allergies. Each one of the tests needed about 20-30 needle pricks on his back then serum was placed on each prick site to determine what he made him allergic. He cried and cried while I held him down, but we both lived through it. Only the seasonal test was conducted on the first visit, so a second visit was required for food allergies. As we headed for the second visit, Chad soon figured out where we were going and begin to cry and beg me not to make him go through it again. My heart nearly broke. I think about what God’s agony the last few hours of His Son’s life.

He saw him as he fell to the ground and then heard his crying and pleading that he not have to suffer the things to come. God watched as the people begin to savagely beat him, spit on him, mock him and shove the crown of thorns on his head. God may have flinched as they drove the nails into Christ. As they pushed the cross into the hole, it bounced around before it finally settled, tearing Jesus’s flesh. As Jeff indicated, a few Sundays ago, the physiological aspect of the cross was for the victim to suffocate. As the upper body sagged, the lungs could not bring in enough air, so the victim would push up with his legs to take in enough air. Jesus suffered long hours on the cross as the crowds continued to mock him. Just before death, Jesus asked His Father, “My God, My God; why have you forsaken me?”. Could you bear to listen to that cry from your child? Could you stand to watch while your child suffered through his final hours on the cross? Sorry, I would not be able to put my own son through this torture and death to save the world. How can I not be grateful to a God who watched His son endure so much to rescue me from hell?

+ Peter denied Christ three times even swearing that he did not know him. After the rooster crowed the third time, Christ looked through the crowd of people right at Peter. One author asked in his book; what was the expression on Christ’s face, anger, frustration, or disappointment? The author believes that Christ expressed none of these but showed love and understanding for Peter. Peter wept bitterly at his denial of Christ. Sometimes when taking the bread and juice, I think about Christ looking at me because of my betrayal of him through my sins. I appreciate the same love he showed Peter.

+ We usually talk about Jesus’s sacrifice in a global sense, John 3:16. He died for the whole world, but sometimes I think about this hymn:

When He Was The Cross I Was On His Mind:

 

“He knew me, yet He loved me;

He whose glory makes the heavens shine;

I’m so unworthy of such mercy yet;

When He was on the cross, I was on His mind.”

+ In 1 Peter 3: 15, we are told: “always to be prepared to give the reason for the hope that we have.” While taking communion, I’m reminded that my hope is grounded in the sacrifice of Jesus’s body and blood, his death and resurrection. He’s the ONLY hope I have!

+ I want to close with some humor. LaGard Smith spends time in England writing. When there, he attends a small congregation who use one cup for the communion. He always tries to get there early, so fewer people have drunk from the cup. Some time ago during one particularly bad flu season, LaGard wondered about partaking of communion. Two older ladies were sitting down the pew from him, and when the cup reached them, they both reached into their purses and took out their straws and proceeded to take the juice.

Thanks, to God and Jesus!

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